Yukiko Wilson on Cloisonné

Yukiko Wilson on Cloisonné

Following up on our last year's encounter with jewellery designer and enamel artist Yukiko Wilson, we recently got together at Boundary Art in Cardiff Bay – a beautiful art gallery and tea garden, where Yukiko kindly demonstrated one of her favourite enamelling techniques, cloisonné, and shared with us the inspiration behind her most recent collection, ENCOUNTERS. 


Words by Yukiko:

Kaji Tsunekichi ( 1803 – 1883 )

Once upon a time, there was a young man called Tsunekichi Kaji, whose family ran a traditional metal plating business in Nagoya a little town in Aichi Prefecture. One day he found an article about shippo (enamel) in an old book and he became transfixed by the craft. However, as few examples existed in Japan, all he could do at the time was just imagine what shippo looked like from the description in the book. Hearing a story about a craftsman called Donin Hirata, who had lived in 17th century Kyoto and learnt enameling from a foreign master and presented an enamel work to the then shogun general, Tsunekichi also started wanting to create enamel pieces himself.

One day, he came across an exquisitely beautiful dish at an antiques shop when he visited Nagoya on business.  He was utterly mesmerized with the piece and he thought it must have been the enamel he had been reading of. He couldn’t afford to buy it so he would constantly return to the shop to observe the dish through the window. After a week, the shop owner was touched with Tsunekichi’s passion about enamel and offered him the piece so that Tsunekichi could study the craft and begin to create enamelware for people in Japan.

He began to study this gift in detail. Days, weeks, months turned into years however all his attempts to create enamel failed. One day seized by an urge to break the enamel dish he hit it with a hammer, breaking the enamel into many small fragments. Amongst them he saw a brown coloured material beneath the glaze and suddenly understood the secret of enamelware - enamel was not based on ceramics as he had always believed but on copper.

Following this breakthrough a few months later, and fourteen years since he first started studying his one piece of enamel, Tsunekichi successfully created a piece of enamel work.

Tsunekichi Kaji began the cloisonné enamel renaissance in Japan that led to Nagoya becoming an internationally successful cloisonné enamel-manufacturing centre in the 19th century. Today some of his works are part of V&A collection in London.
 

梶 常吉 ( 1803 – 1883 )

その昔、尾張藩で鍍金業を営む梶家に、常吉という青年がいました。ある時常吉は、偶然蔵で見つけた古い書物の中に七宝焼の記事を見つけ、すっかり虜になってしまいます。けれども当時、七宝焼は日本には普及しておらず彼に出来る事といえば、ただ本の描写からその工芸品の想像を重ねてみるだけでした。それでもかつて外国人から七宝を学んだという平田道仁という職人が、その珍しい焼き物を時の将軍へ献上したという逸話も耳にし、常吉は自身で七宝焼きを作ってみたいという野望を抱き始めるのです。

ある日、父親の使いで名古屋を訪れた時の事。常吉は、とある骨董屋の店先に飾られていた、それはそれは美しい一枚の皿を目にします。 ”あれは七宝焼に違いない” と思いますが、高価であろうその外国製の品を買う余裕のない彼は、来る日も来る日もただガラス越しにその皿を眺めに、店まで通うことしか出来ませんでした。一週間ののち、骨董屋の主人はとうとう常吉に声を掛けます。事情を知り常吉の情熱に感心した主人は、”宜しいです。それでは、この皿をあなたに差し上げましょう。どうぞ一生懸命研究をして、あなた自身で、日本の人々の為に七宝焼を作り上げて下さい。” と、常吉にその皿を託します。

その日から常吉は、贈られた皿を基に七宝焼の研究に没頭し始めます。ところが、どれほど懸命に試みても、彼は七宝焼を完成させる事が出来ません。数週間、数ヶ月、そしてとうとう数年という年月が流れていきました。そんなある夜、一向に手掛かりの掴めない状態の彼は、おもむろに傍にあった金槌を手にし、七宝皿目掛けて勢いよく振り下ろしました。皿の七宝は破片となって周囲に飛び散っていきました。すると下地となる部分に茶色い金属のようなものが常吉の目に入ります。手にとってみると、彼が長年疑いもせず陶器であると思い込んでいたその下地は、何と銅板であり、それが七宝焼の秘密であった事をついに発見するのです。

この出来事をきっかけに、その数ヶ月のち常吉はようやく夢にまで見た七宝焼の完成に成功。彼が七宝に魅せられたあの日から、実に14年もの歳月が過ぎていました。

梶常吉は19世紀の日本における有線七宝の基礎を作り上げ、名古屋を国際的にも有数な有線七宝の産地として築き上げました。今日、梶常吉の作品はロンドン ヴィクトリア&アルバートミュージアムのコレクションの一部となっています。

§
 

The two traditional styles of enamelling I use are Champlevé and Cloisonné. I also use a technique involving solar-plate etching but today I will demonstrate the Cloisonné technique.

There are many ready mixed colours available on the market but I prefer to make my own unique colours by mixing and grinding pigments.  To work the pigments must be ground to the texture of caster sugar. I use glue made from a cooked sea plant called Funori to help fix the enamel to the metal.

これまで私は、主にシャンルベとクロワゾネという二つの伝統技法で七宝を制作しています。その他、太陽の光を利用するソーラープレートエッチングというテクニックも独自に創作に取入れています。今日はその中で、クロワゾネという有線七宝の制作過程をご紹介します。

市場には既成の七宝釉薬の色が多数揃っていますが、私は、七宝作家向けに特別に開発された釉薬と、それを基に制作したオリジナルの色を使っています。新色として焼成した釉薬はグラニュー糖のような細かさになるまで乳ばちで擦り、その後水洗いをして粉末を取り除き、布海苔(ふのり)と呼ばれる海藻を煮詰めた糊を加えて釉薬として準備します。

§

I’m planning a new collection called ENCOUNTERS, using stones, shells or whatever we encountered while travelling or walking in woods as my inspiration. I have some test pieces inspired by the shapes of the stones we found in Scotland.

The design patterns are mainly from Edo-komon traditional Japanese design - ASANOHA, TATEWAKU, SHIPPO-TSUNAGI, SEIGAIHA, RIKYU-UME PLUM, UROKO, KIKKO and ICHIMATSU with Welsh Blanket patterns. The base shapes are made by hand cutting, filing and shaping sheet metal before preparing the metal ready to accept an enamel covering.

現在ENCOUNTERS (巡り合ったモノたち) という新コレクションを計画中で、これは、旅行先で見つけた石や貝、散歩先の森で拾ってきたもの等からインスピレーションを得たシリーズで、今日は昨年スコットランドで見つけた石にインスパイアされたクロワゾネの試作品を用意しました。

アウトラインは石のフォルムを使い、紋様は日本伝統の江戸小紋の中から、麻の葉、立涌、七宝つなぎ、青海波、利休梅、ウロコ、亀甲そしてウェールズの名産ウェルシュブランケットの柄を組み合わせた市松文様。糸鋸で銅板を切り、ヤスリで整えたのち、バーナーで焼きなましてから、木槌や金槌で軽く丸みを付け、その後銅板の表と裏に下地の釉薬をのせ焼成し、銅板素地の準備段階を完成します。

§

When creating my pieces, I either draw the design onto the metal base or trace using carbon paper. I then glue fine silver ribbon onto the design. Bending, curving and forming the metal ribbons to the shape of the design, creating compartments (Cloisonné means compartment in French) into which I apply enamel glaze. This technique makes Cloisonné enamelling unique compared to other methods. I use traditional glue called Hakkyu, which is made from powdered dried orchid bulb.

Applying the enamel is a long slow process and involves continually adding enamel, drying, firing, cooling and pickling (cleaning in an acid solution) until the required depth and finish is achieved. It takes five firings to complete the work.

Once this is done I start to hand polish the enamel using different grades of stone and charcoal. I then wash the piece and finish with natural beeswax.

赤カーボン紙や水性ペンを使った下書きを銅板へ写した後、植線という工程に入ります。有線七宝は銀線と呼ばれる幅1mm、厚み0.1mm程のリボンをカットし、もようばしと言う専用のピンセットを使って曲げながら、下絵に沿って線を立てていきます。その際、白笈(はっきゅう)という紫蘭の球根を粉末にし、水を加えた糊を接着材にします。

銀線を立て終わった後、表面に希釈した布海苔をスプレーし、透明の釉薬を振掛け、乾燥後一度焼成して、銀線をしっかり銅板のベースに固定させ、いよいよ色差しの工程に移ります。銀線で区切られた模様毎に釉薬を足しながら焼成していく過程は長く時間のかかる作業。施釉、乾燥、焼成、ゆっくりと熱を除いたのち、酸洗いで被膜除去を繰返します。5回程色差しをリピートし、焼成毎に溶けていく釉薬の高さが銀線と同じになれば、そこからは研磨工程になります。

研磨には、粗さの異なる砥石で段々と目を細かくしながら丁寧に磨いていきます。名倉砥石まで終了した後、最後は炭を使って研ぎあげ、蜜蝋で研磨の仕上げをして完成です。

§

EDO-KOMON

Edo-komon are traditional Japanese designs from the Edo period (1603-1867). The motifs consisting of auspicious symbols and patterns are the inspiration for many of my designs.

江戸小紋

元々は江戸時代  (1603-1867) の武家社会で発祥した日本の伝統文様。のちに、江戸以前の意匠も含めその時代に親しまれていた文様を総称して江戸小紋と呼ばれるようになり、着物の柄を始め様々な機会に吉祥の願いやお守りの意味も込めて今日まで愛され続けています。

Asanoha [lozenge shaped] from the foliage of hemp is one of the most popular traditional motifs. As hemp is known for its strong and rapid growth, the design is used in kimonos designed for a newborn baby.

麻の葉:麻の葉をモチーフにした伝統文様。丈夫でスクスクと育つことから、赤ちゃんの産着デザインとしても人気がありました。

Tatewaku [waving pattern] is one type of the Yusoku designs originally for kimono worn by researchers and academics working for the court during the Heian Period (794 - 1185). Tatewaku represents the steam rising from the ground in the spring when many living creatures start to get lively and is regarded as a good luck symbol. 

立涌:元々は平安時代の朝廷に仕えていた研究者、学者の装束用の格式高い吉祥文様。春に生き物が活発に動き出す頃、地面から立ちあがる蒸気を波状に表しています。

Shippo-tsunagi [circular shaped], Shippo (Seven Treasures) means enamel in Japanese. It was also originally created for courtiers during the Heian Era (794 – 1185). The design uses repeating and never-ending interlocking circles, which represent eternity and is regarded as a lucky motif.

七宝つなぎ:平安時代の公家や貴族の装飾品に多用されていた意匠。輪が幾重にも互い違いに広がって行く様から、平和や円満を象徴する縁起の良い吉祥紋。

Seigaiha [fan shaped] represents the calm ocean and is a symbol of good luck that brings gifts from the sea. As the sea is a symbol of eternity, people use this motif to wish for a long-lasting happy life. The name Seigaiha is said to come from the title of the dancing music featured in the Tale of Genji, a novel written during the Heian Period.

青海波:穏やかな海の波を象徴し、恵をもたらす吉祥のシンボル。海は永遠を意味し、末長い幸福への祈りを文様に込めています。青海波という名前は、源氏物語にも登場する雅楽のタイトルが発祥とされています。

Rikyu-ume [floral pattern], Rikyu, from Sen-mno-Rikyu (1522 - 1591), was the greatest tea ceremony master during the Edo-era. Ume means plum blossom, which has always been a much loved design. It is regarded as being a lucky symbol as the plum blossom is one of the first spring flowers to appear after the cold winter.

利休梅:千利休  ( 1522 – 1591 ) が好んだとされる名物裂のデザイン。茶道で使われる仕覆や古帛紗用意匠の代表。梅の花はまだ寒い冬場に可憐に咲き始め、春の到来を告げる縁起の良い花として昔から愛されている文様。

Ichimatsu [checker pattern] is a checkerboard pattern and is named after a popular Kabuki actor from the Edo era. Matsu is Japanese for pine and as an evergreen tree, it is regarded as being lucky.

市松:古墳時代より、織文様として存在していた意匠。正倉院の装飾品にも数多く見られるシンプルな格子文様は、もともと石畳という名称であったものが、のち江戸時代に活躍した歌舞伎役者の着物の柄にちなみ、市松として今日まで親しまれているデザイン。2020年東京オリンピック・パラリンピックのエンブレムとしても起用されています。

Uroko [triangular shaped], meaning scale (fish or snake) in Japanese. As scales protect, they are often used as a motif to ward off evil, people, especially men, would use this pattern for the lining fabric of a kimono to bring good luck. As snakes shed their skin, it is also seen as a symbol of rebirth.

ウロコ:魚や蛇の鱗を表すデザイン。体を守る鱗から邪気を払うお守りの意味合いも兼ねた文様。特に男性には着物の裏地などにひっそりと使われていました。蛇の鱗は脱皮を連想させ、再生のシンボルとしても使われます。

Kikko [hexagon shaped], meaning turtle or tortoise shell in Japanese, is an ancient auspicious design. It is said that cranes live for 1,000 years and tortoises for 10,000 years so they have been two of the most popular symbols for longevity and good luck, especially for weddings. This simple hexagon shape from the pattern in a turtle’s shell represents the beauty of the natural world.

亀甲:亀の甲羅を表す古代文様。鶴は千年、亀は万年と言われ長寿や幸運のシンボルで、特に結婚式お祝いの機会に好まれて使われます。シンプルな六角形の文様は、雪の結晶、蜜蜂の巣にも共通する自然界の美の象徴として愛されています。

Thank you, Yukiko for the beautiful demonstration. Also, many thanks to Yukiko's husband, Chris, for his patience and help, and to Cate and Joanne of Bounday Art for kindly allowing us use their venue and for the always amazing tea!